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Proceedings Paper

GALACSI system design and analysis
Author(s): S. Ströbele; P. La Penna; R. Arsenault; R. D. Conzelmann; B. Delabre; M. Duchateau; R. Dorn; E. Fedrigo; N. Hubin; J. Quentin; P. Jolley; M. Kiekebusch; J. P. Kirchbauer; B. Klein; J. Kolb; H. Kuntschner; M. Le Louarn; J. L. Lizon; P.-Y. Madec; L. Pettazzi; C. Soenke; S. Tordo; J. Vernet; R. Muradore
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Paper Abstract

GALACSI is one of the Adaptive Optics (AO) systems part of the ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). It will use the VLT 4-Laser Guide Stars system, high speed and low noise WaveFront Sensor cameras (<1e-, 1000Hz) the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) and the SPARTA Real Time Computer to sharpen images and enhance faint object detectability of the MUSE Instrument. MUSE is an Integral Field Spectrograph working at wavelengths from 465nm to 930nm. GALACSI implements 2 different AO modes; in Wide Field Mode (WFM) it will perform Ground Layer AO correction and enhance the collected energy in a 0.2" by 0.2" pixel by a factor 2 at 750nm over a Field of View (FoV) of 1' by 1'. The 4 LGSs and one tip tilt reference star (R-mag <17.5) are located outside the MUSE FoV. Key requirements are to provide this performance and a very good image stability for a 1hour long integration time. In Narrow Field Mode (NFM) Laser Tomography AO will be used to reconstruct and correct the turbulence for the center field using the 4 LGSs at 15" off axis and the Near Infra Red (NIR) light of one reference star on axis for tip tilt and focus sensing. In NFM GALACSI will provide a moderate Strehl Ratio of 5% (goal 10%) at 650nm. The NFM hosts several challenges and many subsystems will be pushed to their limits. The opto mechanical design and error budgets of GALACSI is described here.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 September 2012
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 8447, Adaptive Optics Systems III, 844737 (13 September 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.926110
Show Author Affiliations
S. Ströbele, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
P. La Penna, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
R. Arsenault, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
R. D. Conzelmann, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
B. Delabre, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
M. Duchateau, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
R. Dorn, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
E. Fedrigo, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
N. Hubin, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
J. Quentin, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
P. Jolley, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
M. Kiekebusch, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
J. P. Kirchbauer, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
B. Klein, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
J. Kolb, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
H. Kuntschner, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
M. Le Louarn, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
J. L. Lizon, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
P.-Y. Madec, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
L. Pettazzi, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
C. Soenke, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
S. Tordo, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
J. Vernet, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
R. Muradore, Univ. of Verona (Italy)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8447:
Adaptive Optics Systems III
Brent L. Ellerbroek; Enrico Marchetti; Jean-Pierre Véran, Editor(s)

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