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Proceedings Paper

Three recipes for improving the image quality with optical long-baseline interferometers: BFMC, LFF, and DPSC
Author(s): Florentin A. Millour; Martin Vannier; Anthony Meilland
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Paper Abstract

We present here three recipes for getting better images with optical interferometers. Two of them, Low- Frequencies Filling and Brute-Force Monte Carlo were used in our participation to the Interferometry Beauty Contest this year and can be applied to classical imaging using V2 and closure phases. These two addition to image reconstruction provide a way of having more reliable images. The last recipe is similar in its principle as the self-calibration technique used in radio-interferometry. We call it also self-calibration, but it uses the wavelength-differential phase as a proxy of the object phase to build-up a full-featured complex visibility set of the observed object. This technique needs a first image-reconstruction run with an available software, using closure-phases and squared visibilities only. We used it for two scientific papers with great success. We discuss here the pros and cons of such imaging technique.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 September 2012
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 8445, Optical and Infrared Interferometry III, 84451B (12 September 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.925689
Show Author Affiliations
Florentin A. Millour, Lab. Lagrange, Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (France)
Martin Vannier, Lab. Lagrange, Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (France)
Anthony Meilland, Lab. Lagrange, Univ. Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (France)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8445:
Optical and Infrared Interferometry III
Françoise Delplancke; Jayadev K. Rajagopal; Fabien Malbet, Editor(s)

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