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Proceedings Paper

Innovative technology for optical and infrared astronomy
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Paper Abstract

Advances in astronomy are often enabled by adoption of new technology. In some instances this is where the technology has been invented specifically for astronomy, but more usually it is adopted from another scientific or industrial area of application. The adoption of new technology typically occurs via one of two processes. The more usual is incremental progress by a series of small improvements, but occasionally this process is disruptive, where a new technology completely replaces an older one. One of the activities of the OPTICON Key Technology Network over the past few years has been a technology forecasting exercise. Here we report on a recent event which focused on the more radical, potentially disruptive technologies for ground-based, optical and infrared astronomy.

Paper Details

Date Published: 13 September 2012
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 8450, Modern Technologies in Space- and Ground-based Telescopes and Instrumentation II, 845031 (13 September 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.925573
Show Author Affiliations
Colin R Cunningham, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
Christopher J. Evans, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., Royal Observatory (United Kingdom)
Frank Molster, Leiden Observatory, Leiden Univ. (Netherlands)
Sarah Kendrew, Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (Germany)
Matthew A. Kenworthy, Leiden Observatory, Leiden Univ. (Netherlands)
Frans Snik, Leiden Observatory, Leiden Univ. (Netherlands)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8450:
Modern Technologies in Space- and Ground-based Telescopes and Instrumentation II
Ramón Navarro; Colin R. Cunningham; Eric Prieto, Editor(s)

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