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Proceedings Paper

High-resolution and high-precision color-differential astrometry for direct spectroscopy of extrasolar planets onboard SPICA: science and validation experiment
Author(s): Lyu Abe; Martin Vannier; Jean-Pierre Rivet; Carole Gouvret; Aurélie Marcotto; Romain Petrov; Keigo Enya; Hirokazu Kataza
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Paper Abstract

We describe the principles and potential of Color-Differential Astrometry (CDA), a high-resolution technique easily implementable on the Science Coronographic Instrument (SCI) of the SPICA satellite, and aimed here at the direct detection and spectroscopy of giant Extrasolar Planets (ESP). By measuring the photocentre of the source diffraction pattern relatively between dispersed spectral channels, CDA gives access to flux ratio and angular information well beyond the telescope resolution limit. Applied to known ESPs, it can yield the inclination (thus the mass) and spectrum of the planet. Our estimates show that low-resolution spectroscopy of Jupiter-radius ESP can be measured within a few hours for planets at orbital distances ranging from 0.05 AU to a few AUs, thus complementing the detection range expected using the coronographic measurements. More generally, it may also apply to any unresolved source with some wavelength-dependent asymmetry. In addition to the ESP cases considered for the scientific signal and to their associated fundamental noises, we also present the instrumental effects and a dedicated optical testbench. The combined effects of several instrumental noise sources can be introduced into our numerical model (pointing errors, beam tip-tilt, optical aberations, variations of the detector gain table), and then confronted to measurements from the experimental testbench.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 September 2012
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 8442, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2012: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave, 84423Q (21 September 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.925566
Show Author Affiliations
Lyu Abe, Lab. J.-L. Lagrange, , CNRS, Univ. of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (France)
Martin Vannier, Lab. J.-L. Lagrange, , CNRS, Univ. of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (France)
Jean-Pierre Rivet, Lab. J.-L. Lagrange, , CNRS, Univ. of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (France)
Carole Gouvret, Lab. J.-L. Lagrange, , CNRS, Univ. of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (France)
Aurélie Marcotto, Lab. J.-L. Lagrange, , CNRS, Univ. of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (France)
Romain Petrov, Lab. J.-L. Lagrange, , CNRS, Univ. of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (France)
Keigo Enya, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
Hirokazu Kataza, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8442:
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2012: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave
Mark C. Clampin; Giovanni G. Fazio; Howard A. MacEwen; Jacobus M. Oschmann, Editor(s)

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