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Proceedings Paper

Key science drivers for MICHI: a mid-IR instrument concept for the TMT
Author(s): Chris Packham; M. Honda; M. Richter; Y. K. Okamoto; H. Kataza; T. Onaka; T. Fujiyoshi; A. Tokunaga; M. Chun; A. Alonso-Herrero; J. Carr; M. Chiba; K Enya; H. Fujiwara; P Gandhi; M. Imanishi; K. Ichikawa; Y. Ita; N. Kawakatsu; T. Kotani; N. Levenson; T. Matsuo; M. Matsuura; T. Minezaki; J. Najita; N. Oi; T. Ootsubo; I. Sakon; M. Takami; C. Telesco; C. M. Wright; T. Yamashita
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Paper Abstract

A mid-infrared (MIR) imager and spectrometer is being investigated for possible construction in the early operation of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Combined with the MIR adaptive optics (AO) system (MIRAO), the instrument will afford ~15 times higher sensitivity and ~4 times better spatial resolution (0.07”) at 10μm compared to 8m-class telescopes. Additionally, through exploiting the large collection area of the TMT, the high-dispersion spectroscopy mode will be unrivaled by other ground- and space-based facilities. These combined capabilities offer the possibility for breakthrough science, as well as ‘workhorse’ observing modes of imaging and low/moderate spectral resolution. In this paper we summarize the primary science drivers that are guiding the instrument design.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 September 2012
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 8446, Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV, 84467G (24 September 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.924996
Show Author Affiliations
Chris Packham, Univ. of Texas San Antonio (United States)
Univ. of Florida (United States)
M. Honda, Kanagawa Univ. (Japan)
M. Richter, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Y. K. Okamoto, Ibaraki Univ. (Japan)
H. Kataza, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
T. Onaka, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
T. Fujiyoshi, Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (United States)
A. Tokunaga, Institute for Astronomy, Univ. of Hawai'i (United States)
M. Chun, Institute for Astronomy, Univ. of Hawai'i (United States)
A. Alonso-Herrero, Instituto de Física de Cantabria (Spain)
J. Carr, U.S. Naval Research Lab (United States)
M. Chiba, Tohoku Univ. (Japan)
K Enya, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
H. Fujiwara, Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (United States)
P Gandhi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
M. Imanishi, Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (United States)
K. Ichikawa, Univ. of Kyoto (Japan)
Y. Ita, Tohoku Univ. (Japan)
N. Kawakatsu, Tsukuba Univ. (Japan)
T. Kotani, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan)
N. Levenson, Gemini Observatory (Chile)
T. Matsuo, Univ. of Kyoto (Japan)
M. Matsuura, Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
T. Minezaki, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
J. Najita, National Optical Astronomy Observatory (United States)
N. Oi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan)
T. Ootsubo, Tohoku Univ. (Japan)
I. Sakon, Institute of Astronomy, The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
M. Takami, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (Taiwan)
C. Telesco, Univ. of Texas San Antonio (United States)
C. M. Wright, Univ. of New South Wales (Australia)
T. Yamashita, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8446:
Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy IV
Ian S. McLean; Suzanne K. Ramsay; Hideki Takami, Editor(s)

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