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Proceedings Paper

Impedance spectroscopy for the detection and identification of unknown toxins
Author(s): B. C. Riggs; G. E. Plopper; J. L. Paluh; T. B. Phamduy; D. T. Corr; D. B. Chrisey
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Paper Abstract

Advancements in biological and chemical warfare has allowed for the creation of novel toxins necessitating a universal, real-time sensor. We have used a function-based biosensor employing impedance spectroscopy using a low current density AC signal over a range of frequencies (62.5 Hz-64 kHz) to measure the electrical impedance of a confluent epithelial cell monolayer at 120 sec intervals. Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells were grown to confluence on thin film interdigitated gold electrodes. A stable impedance measurement of 2200 Ω was found after 24 hrs of growth. After exposure to cytotoxins anthrax lethal toxin and etoposide, the impedance decreased in a linear fashion resulting in a 50% drop in impedance over 50hrs showing significant difference from the control sample (~20% decrease). Immunofluorescent imaging showed that apoptosis was induced through the addition of toxins. Similarities of the impedance signal shows that the mechanism of cellular death was the same between ALT and etoposide. A revised equivalent circuit model was employed in order to quantify morphological changes in the cell monolayer such as tight junction integrity and cell surface area coverage. This model showed a faster response to cytotoxin (2 hrs) compared to raw measurements (20 hrs). We demonstrate that herein that impedance spectroscopy of epithelial monolayers serves as a real-time non-destructive sensor for unknown pathogens.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 May 2012
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 8371, Sensing Technologies for Global Health, Military Medicine, Disaster Response, and Environmental Monitoring II; and Biometric Technology for Human Identification IX, 83711F (4 May 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.919542
Show Author Affiliations
B. C. Riggs, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (United States)
G. E. Plopper, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (United States)
J. L. Paluh, Univ. of Albany (United States)
T. B. Phamduy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (United States)
D. T. Corr, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (United States)
D. B. Chrisey, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8371:
Sensing Technologies for Global Health, Military Medicine, Disaster Response, and Environmental Monitoring II; and Biometric Technology for Human Identification IX
Sárka O. Southern; B. V. K. Vijaya Kumar; Salil Prabhakar; Arend H. J. Kolk; Kevin N. Montgomery; Arun A. Ross; Carl W. Taylor, Editor(s)

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