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Proceedings Paper

Forensic practice in the field of protection of cultural heritage
Author(s): Marek Kotrlý; Ivana Turková
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Paper Abstract

Microscopic methods play a key role in issues covering analyses of objects of art that are used on the one hand as screening ones, on the other hand they can lead to obtaining data relevant for completion of expertise. Analyses of artworks, gemmological objects and other highly valuable commodities usually do not rank among routine ones, but every analysis is specific, be it e.g. material investigation of artworks, historical textile materials and other antiques (coins, etc.), identification of fragments (from transporters, storage places, etc.), period statues, sculptures compared to originals, analyses of gems and jewellery, etc. A number of analytical techniques may be employed: optical microscopy in transmitted and reflected light, polarization and fluorescence in visible, UV and IR radiation; image analysis, quantitative microspectrophotometry; SEM/EDS/WDS; FTIR and Raman spectroscopy; XRF and microXRF, including mobile one; XRD and microXRD; x-ray backlight or LA-ICP-MS, SIMS, PIXE; further methods of organic analysis are also utilised - GS-MS, MALDI-TOF, etc.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 May 2012
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8378, Scanning Microscopies 2012: Advanced Microscopy Technologies for Defense, Homeland Security, Forensic, Life, Environmental, and Industrial Sciences, 83780Y (14 May 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.919290
Show Author Affiliations
Marek Kotrlý, Institute of Criminalistics Prague (Czech Republic)
Ivana Turková, Institute of Criminalistics Prague (Czech Republic)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8378:
Scanning Microscopies 2012: Advanced Microscopy Technologies for Defense, Homeland Security, Forensic, Life, Environmental, and Industrial Sciences
Michael T. Postek; Dale E. Newbury; S. Frank Platek; David C. Joy; Tim K. Maugel, Editor(s)

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