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Proceedings Paper

A LWIR hyperspectral imager using a Sagnac interferometer and cooled HgCdTe detector array
Author(s): Paul G. Lucey; Mark Wood; Sarah T. Crites; Jason Akagi
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Paper Abstract

LWIR hyperspectral imaging has a wide range of civil and military applications with its ability to sense chemical compositions at standoff ranges. Most recent implementations of this technology use spectrographs employing varying degrees of cryogenic cooling to reduce sensor self-emission that can severely limit sensitivity. We have taken an interferometric approach that promises to reduce the need for cooling while preserving high resolution. Reduced cooling has multiple benefits including faster system readiness from a power off state, lower mass, and potentially lower cost owing to lower system complexity. We coupled an uncooled Sagnac interferometer with a 256x320 mercury cadmium telluride array with an 11 micron cutoff to produce a spatial interferometric LWIR hyperspectral imaging system operating from 7.5 to 11 microns. The sensor was tested in ground-ground applications, and from a small aircraft producing spectral imagery including detection of gas emission from high vapor pressure liquids.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 May 2012
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8390, Algorithms and Technologies for Multispectral, Hyperspectral, and Ultraspectral Imagery XVIII, 83900Q (15 May 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.918970
Show Author Affiliations
Paul G. Lucey, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
Mark Wood, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
Sarah T. Crites, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
Jason Akagi, Spectrum Photonics, Inc. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8390:
Algorithms and Technologies for Multispectral, Hyperspectral, and Ultraspectral Imagery XVIII
Sylvia S. Shen; Paul E. Lewis, Editor(s)

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