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Proceedings Paper

Automatic human action recognition in a scene from visual inputs
Author(s): Henri Bouma; Patrick Hanckmann; Jan-Willem Marck; Leo Penning; Richard den Hollander; Johan-Martijn ten Hove; Sebastiaan van den Broek; Klamer Schutte; Gertjan Burghouts
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Paper Abstract

Surveillance is normally performed by humans, since it requires visual intelligence. However, this can be dull and dangerous, especially for military operations. Therefore, unmanned autonomous visual-intelligence systems are desired. In this paper, we present a novel system that can recognize human actions, which are relevant to detect operationally significant activity. Central to the system is a break-down of high-level perceptual concepts (verbs) in simpler observable events. The system is trained on 3482 videos and evaluated on 2589 videos from the DARPA Mind's Eye program, with for each video human annotations indicating the presence or absence of 48 different actions. The results show that our system reaches good performance approaching the human average response.

Paper Details

Date Published: 25 May 2012
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 8388, Unattended Ground, Sea, and Air Sensor Technologies and Applications XIV, 83880L (25 May 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.918582
Show Author Affiliations
Henri Bouma, TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Netherlands)
Patrick Hanckmann, TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Netherlands)
Jan-Willem Marck, TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Netherlands)
Leo Penning, TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Netherlands)
Richard den Hollander, TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Netherlands)
Johan-Martijn ten Hove, TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Netherlands)
Sebastiaan van den Broek, TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Netherlands)
Klamer Schutte, TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Netherlands)
Gertjan Burghouts, TNO Defence, Security and Safety (Netherlands)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8388:
Unattended Ground, Sea, and Air Sensor Technologies and Applications XIV
Edward M. Carapezza, Editor(s)

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