Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Lithium iron phosphates as cathode materials in lithium ion batteries for electric vehicles
Author(s): Gaojun Wang; Linfeng Chen; Gyanesh N. Mathur; Vijay K. Varadan
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

Olivine-structured lithium iron phosphates are promising cathode materials in the development of high power lithium ion batteries for electric vehicles. However, the low electronic conductivity and ionic conductivity of lithium iron phosphates hinder their commercialization pace. This work aims to verify the approaches for improving the electrochemical properties of lithium iron phosphates. In this work, sol-gel method was used to synthesize carbon coated lithium iron phosphates and nickel doped lithium iron phosphates, and their particle sizes were controlled in the nanometer to sub-micrometer range. The crystalline structures of the synthesized lithium iron phosphates were characterized by X-ray diffraction, and their morphologies were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. To study their electrochemical properties, prototype lithium ion batteries were assembled with the synthesized lithium iron phosphates as cathode active materials, and with lithium metal discs as the anodes, and the discharge / charge properties and cycling behaviors of the prototype batteries were tested at different rates. The synthesized lithium iron phosphate materials exhibited high capacity and high cycling stability. It was confirmed that particle size reduction, carbon coating and metal doping are three effective approaches for increasing the conductivity of lithium iron phosphates, and thus improving their electrochemical properties. Experimental results show that by combing the three approaches for improving the electrochemical properties, lithium iron phosphate composites with characteristics favorable for their applications in lithium ion batteries for electric vehicles can be developed, including high specific capacity, high rate capacity, flat discharge voltage plateau and high retention ratio.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 March 2012
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8344, Nanosensors, Biosensors, and Info-Tech Sensors and Systems 2012, 83440L (30 March 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.915638
Show Author Affiliations
Gaojun Wang, Shaoxing Univ. (China)
Univ. of Arkansas (United States)
Linfeng Chen, Univ. of Arkansas (United States)
Gyanesh N. Mathur, Univ. of Arkansas (United States)
Vijay K. Varadan, Univ. of Arkansas (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8344:
Nanosensors, Biosensors, and Info-Tech Sensors and Systems 2012
Vijay K. Varadan, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top