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Proceedings Paper

Impact damage characterization in cross-plied carbon fiber/thermoplastic composites using thermoelastic stress analysis
Author(s): T. Yoshida; T. Uenoya; H. Miyamoto
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Paper Abstract

Carbon fiber (CF)-plastic composites are expected from the view point of light weighting vehicle structures. The CF/thermoset plastic laminates have low damage resistance to out-of-plane impact as a problem to be solved, because they behave as a low strength inter-laminar as compared with high-strength in fiber direction. Accordingly it is strongly desired to develop CF-composite materials based thermoplastics that have higher toughness than thermoset, for vehicle use. The present paper describes investigation of impact damages through thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA). Lowvelocity impact test using drop weight was conducted on stitched non-crimp-fabric CF/NY6 composite specimens. Stress distribution of the specimens under impact loading was monitored by a lock-in thermography system from the opposite side of the impact direction. The instrumentation system, which had a focal plane array detector, provided a succession of thermoelastic stress information as a sequence of TSA images at a high rate. The measured stress distribution agreed well with a theoretical. And also, selecting a contour feature of the stress distribution determined with a suitable level conformed approximately to the internal damage image that was processed from the TSA images obtained before and after impact.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 May 2012
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8347, Nondestructive Characterization for Composite Materials, Aerospace Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Homeland Security 2012, 83470P (2 May 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.915144
Show Author Affiliations
T. Yoshida, Doshisha Univ. (Japan)
T. Uenoya, Doshisha Univ. (Japan)
H. Miyamoto, Doshisha Univ. (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8347:
Nondestructive Characterization for Composite Materials, Aerospace Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Homeland Security 2012
Andrew L. Gyekenyesi, Editor(s)

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