Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Vibroacoustic studies on sounding rocket bulkheads
Author(s): Jeffrey L. Comrie; Umesh A. Korde
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

The natural frequency coupling of 2 components of a sounding rocket system is studied, the forward bulkhead (commonly referred to as the "bulkhead" or "BH") and the payload cavity within the fairing. The bulkhead was modeled as a thin, flat, circular plate with a clamped boundary condition. The payload cavity was modeled as a column of air with closed ends contained by the rocket fairing. Both components were studied individually, and added together to obtain a coupled effect. The components were studied in terms of theoretical calculations and understanding, while testing the theory against experiments conducted in the laboratory. When appreciable differences between theory and experimental results were within reason for the individual components, the coupled system was tested. This methodology enabled a "piecewise" approach to studying and acquiring natural frequency shifting of the sounding rocket model through coupling. Experimental work for frequency tuning of the bulkhead through internal pressure modulation is presented. Guidelines for improvement of the vibroacoustic response through structural redesign and frequency tuning of sounding rockets are detailed.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 March 2012
PDF: 16 pages
Proc. SPIE 8341, Active and Passive Smart Structures and Integrated Systems 2012, 834117 (27 March 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.914753
Show Author Affiliations
Jeffrey L. Comrie, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (United States)
Umesh A. Korde, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8341:
Active and Passive Smart Structures and Integrated Systems 2012
Henry A. Sodano, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top