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Proceedings Paper

Sound meets image: freedom of expression in texture description
Author(s): Reinier J. Jansen; René van Egmond; Huib de Ridder
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Paper Abstract

The use of sound was explored as means for expressing perceptual attributes of visual textures. Two sets of 17 visual textures were prepared: one set taken from the CUReT database, and one set synthesized to replicate the former set. Participants were instructed to match a sound texture with a visual texture displayed onscreen. A modified version of a Product Sound Sketching Tool was provided, in which an interactive physical interface was coupled to a frequency modulation synthesizer. Rather than selecting from a pre-defined set of sound samples, continuous exploration of the auditory space allowed for an increased freedom of expression. While doing so, participants were asked to describe what auditory and visual qualities they were paying attention to. It was found that participants were able to create sounds that matched visual textures. Based on differences in diversity of descriptions, synthetic textures were found to have less salient perceptual attributes than their original counterparts. Finally, three interesting sound synthesis clusters were found, corresponding with mutually exclusive description vocabularies.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 February 2012
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 8291, Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XVII, 829119 (28 February 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.914698
Show Author Affiliations
Reinier J. Jansen, Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands)
René van Egmond, Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands)
Huib de Ridder, Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8291:
Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XVII
Bernice E. Rogowitz; Thrasyvoulos N. Pappas; Huib de Ridder, Editor(s)

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