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Proceedings Paper

Validation of geometric measurements of the left atrium and pulmonary veins for analysis of reverse structural remodeling following ablation therapy
Author(s): M. E. Rettmann; D. R. Holmes; M. S. Gunawan; X. Ge; R. A. Karwoski; J. F. Breen; D. L. Packer; R. A. Robb
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Paper Abstract

Geometric analysis of the left atrium and pulmonary veins is important for studying reverse structural remodeling following cardiac ablation therapy. It has been shown that the left atrium decreases in volume and the pulmonary vein ostia decrease in diameter following ablation therapy. Most analysis techniques, however, require laborious manual tracing of image cross-sections. Pulmonary vein diameters are typically measured at the junction between the left atrium and pulmonary veins, called the pulmonary vein ostia, with manually drawn lines on volume renderings or on image cross-sections. In this work, we describe a technique for making semi-automatic measurements of the left atrium and pulmonary vein ostial diameters from high resolution CT scans and multi-phase datasets. The left atrium and pulmonary veins are segmented from a CT volume using a 3D volume approach and cut planes are interactively positioned to separate the pulmonary veins from the body of the left atrium. The cut plane is also used to compute the pulmonary vein ostial diameter. Validation experiments are presented which demonstrate the ability to repeatedly measure left atrial volume and pulmonary vein diameters from high resolution CT scans, as well as the feasibility of this approach for analyzing dynamic, multi-phase datasets. In the high resolution CT scans the left atrial volume measurements show high repeatability with approximately 4% intra-rater repeatability and 8% inter-rater repeatability. Intra- and inter-rater repeatability for pulmonary vein diameter measurements range from approximately 2 to 4 mm. For the multi-phase CT datasets, differences in left atrial volumes between a standard slice-by-slice approach and the proposed 3D volume approach are small, with percent differences on the order of 3% to 6%.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 April 2012
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 8317, Medical Imaging 2012: Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging, 831724 (16 April 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.912801
Show Author Affiliations
M. E. Rettmann, Mayo Clinic (United States)
D. R. Holmes, Mayo Clinic (United States)
M. S. Gunawan, Georgetown Univ. (United States)
X. Ge, Mayo Clinic (United States)
R. A. Karwoski, Mayo Clinic (United States)
J. F. Breen, Mayo Clinic (United States)
D. L. Packer, Mayo Clinic (United States)
R. A. Robb, Mayo Clinic (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8317:
Medical Imaging 2012: Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging
Robert C. Molthen; John B. Weaver, Editor(s)

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