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Proceedings Paper

Quantitative vertebral compression fracture evaluation using a height compass
Author(s): Jianhua Yao; Joseph E. Burns; Tatjana Wiese; Ronald M. Summers
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Paper Abstract

Vertebral compression fractures can be caused by even minor trauma in patients with pathological conditions such as osteoporosis, varying greatly in vertebral body location and compression geometry. The location and morphology of the compression injury can guide decision making for treatment modality (vertebroplasty versus surgical fixation), and can be important for pre-surgical planning. We propose a height compass to evaluate the axial plane spatial distribution of compression injury (anterior, posterior, lateral, and central), and distinguish it from physiologic height variations of normal vertebrae. The method includes four steps: spine segmentation and partition, endplate detection, height compass computation and compression fracture evaluation. A height compass is computed for each vertebra, where the vertebral body is partitioned in the axial plane into 17 cells oriented about concentric rings. In the compass structure, a crown-like geometry is produced by three concentric rings which are divided into 8 equal length arcs by rays which are subtended by 8 common central angles. The radius of each ring increases multiplicatively, with resultant structure of a central node and two concentric surrounding bands of cells, each divided into octants. The height value for each octant is calculated and plotted against octants in neighboring vertebrae. The height compass shows intuitive display of the height distribution and can be used to easily identify the fracture regions. Our technique was evaluated on 8 thoraco-abdominal CT scans of patients with reported compression fractures and showed statistically significant differences in height value at the sites of the fractures.

Paper Details

Date Published: 23 February 2012
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8315, Medical Imaging 2012: Computer-Aided Diagnosis, 83151X (23 February 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.911703
Show Author Affiliations
Jianhua Yao, National Institutes of Health (United States)
Joseph E. Burns, Univ. of California, Irvine (United States)
Tatjana Wiese, National Institutes of Health (United States)
Ronald M. Summers, National Institutes of Health (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8315:
Medical Imaging 2012: Computer-Aided Diagnosis
Bram van Ginneken; Carol L. Novak, Editor(s)

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