Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Combined collimator/reconstruction optimization for myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging using polar map-based LROC numerical observer
Author(s): Souleymane Konate; P. Hendrik Pretorius; Howard C. Gifford; J. Michael O'Connor; Arda Konik; Mohammed Salman Shazeeb; Michael A. King
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

Polar maps have been used to assist clinicians diagnose coronary artery diseases (CAD) in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging. Herein, we investigate the optimization of collimator design for perfusion defect detection in SPECT imaging when reconstruction includes modeling of the collimator. The optimization employs an LROC clinical model observer (CMO), which emulates the clinical task of polar map detection of CAD. By utilizing a CMO, which better mimics the clinical perfusion-defect detection task than previous SKE based observers, our objective is to optimize collimator design for SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging when reconstruction includes compensation for collimator spatial resolution. Comparison of lesion detection accuracy will then be employed to determine if a lower spatial resolution hence higher sensitivity collimator design than currently recommended could be utilized to reduce the radiation dose to the patient, imaging time, or a combination of both. As the first step in this investigation, we report herein on the optimization of the three-dimensional (3D) post-reconstruction Gaussian filtering of and the number of iterations used to reconstruct the SPECT slices of projections acquired by a low-energy generalpurpose (LEGP) collimator. The optimization was in terms of detection accuracy as determined by our CMO and four human observers. Both the human and all four CMO variants agreed that the optimal post-filtering was with sigma of the Gaussian in the range of 0.75 to 1.0 pixels. In terms of number of iterations, the human observers showed a preference for 5 iterations; however, only one of the variants of the CMO agreed with this selection. The others showed a preference for 15 iterations. We shall thus proceed to optimize the reconstruction parameters for even higher sensitivity collimators using this CMO, and then do the final comparison between collimators using their individually optimized parameters with human observers and three times the test images to reduce the statistical variation seen in our present results.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 February 2012
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8318, Medical Imaging 2012: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment, 83181L (29 February 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.911479
Show Author Affiliations
Souleymane Konate, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
P. Hendrik Pretorius, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Howard C. Gifford, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
J. Michael O'Connor, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Arda Konik, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Mohammed Salman Shazeeb, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)
Michael A. King, Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8318:
Medical Imaging 2012: Image Perception, Observer Performance, and Technology Assessment
Craig K. Abbey; Claudia R. Mello-Thoms, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top