Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Use of a graphics processing unit (GPU) to facilitate real-time 3D graphic presentation of the patient skin-dose distribution during fluoroscopic interventional procedures
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

We have developed a dose-tracking system (DTS) that calculates the radiation dose to the patient's skin in realtime by acquiring exposure parameters and imaging-system-geometry from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix C-arm unit. The cumulative dose values are then displayed as a color map on an OpenGL-based 3D graphic of the patient for immediate feedback to the interventionalist. Determination of those elements on the surface of the patient 3D-graphic that intersect the beam and calculation of the dose for these elements in real time demands fast computation. Reducing the size of the elements results in more computation load on the computer processor and therefore a tradeoff occurs between the resolution of the patient graphic and the real-time performance of the DTS. The speed of the DTS for calculating dose to the skin is limited by the central processing unit (CPU) and can be improved by using the parallel processing power of a graphics processing unit (GPU). Here, we compare the performance speed of GPU-based DTS software to that of the current CPU-based software as a function of the resolution of the patient graphics. Results show a tremendous improvement in speed using the GPU. While an increase in the spatial resolution of the patient graphics resulted in slowing down the computational speed of the DTS on the CPU, the speed of the GPU-based DTS was hardly affected. This GPU-based DTS can be a powerful tool for providing accurate, real-time feedback about patient skin-dose to physicians while performing interventional procedures.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 March 2012
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8313, Medical Imaging 2012: Physics of Medical Imaging, 831343 (3 March 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.911344
Show Author Affiliations
Vijay Rana, Toshiba Stroke Research Ctr., Univ. at Buffalo (United States)
Stephen Rudin, Toshiba Stroke Research Ctr., Univ. at Buffalo (United States)
Daniel R. Bednarek, Toshiba Stroke Research Ctr., Univ. at Buffalo (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8313:
Medical Imaging 2012: Physics of Medical Imaging
Norbert J. Pelc; Robert M. Nishikawa; Bruce R. Whiting, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top