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Paper Abstract

Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology can provide for deformable mirrors (DMs) with excellent performance within a favorable economy of scale. Large MEMS-based astronomical adaptive optics (AO) systems such as the Gemini Planet Imager are coming on-line soon. As MEMS DM end-users, we discuss our decade of practice with the micromirrors, from inspecting and characterizing devices to evaluating their performance in the lab. We also show MEMS wavefront correction on-sky with the "Villages" AO system on a 1-m telescope, including open-loop control and visible-light imaging. Our work demonstrates the maturity of MEMS technology for astronomical adaptive optics.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 February 2012
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 8253, MEMS Adaptive Optics VI, 825304 (15 February 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.910964
Show Author Affiliations
Katie M. Morzinski, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Andrew P. Norton, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
Julia Wilhelmson Evans, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
Layra Reza, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
Scott A. Severson, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
Sonoma State Univ. (United States)
Daren Dillon, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
Marc Reinig, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
Donald T. Gavel, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
Steven Cornelissen, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
Boston Micromachines Corp. (United States)
Bruce A. Macintosh, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Claire E. Max, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8253:
MEMS Adaptive Optics VI
Scot S. Olivier; Thomas G. Bifano; Joel Kubby, Editor(s)

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