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Proceedings Paper

Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation
Author(s): Daniel Perry; Alan Morris; Nathan Burgon; Christopher McGann; Robert MacLeod; Joshua Cates
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Paper Abstract

Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

Paper Details

Date Published: 23 February 2012
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 8315, Medical Imaging 2012: Computer-Aided Diagnosis, 83151D (23 February 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.910833
Show Author Affiliations
Daniel Perry, The Univ. of Utah (United States)
Alan Morris, The Univ. of Utah (United States)
Nathan Burgon, The Univ. of Utah (United States)
Christopher McGann, The Univ. of Utah (United States)
Robert MacLeod, The Univ. of Utah (United States)
Joshua Cates, The Univ. of Utah (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8315:
Medical Imaging 2012: Computer-Aided Diagnosis
Bram van Ginneken; Carol L. Novak, Editor(s)

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