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Proceedings Paper

Trap depth optimization to improve optical properties of diopside-based nanophosphors for medical imaging
Author(s): Thomas Maldiney; Aurélie Lecointre; Bruno Viana; Aurélie Bessière; Didier Gourier; Michel Bessodes; Cyrille Richard; Daniel Scherman
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Paper Abstract

Regarding its ability to circumvent the autofluorescence signal, persistent luminescence was recently shown to be a powerful tool for in vivo imaging and diagnosis applications in living animal. The concept was introduced with lanthanide-doped persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNP), from a lanthanide-doped silicate host Ca0.2Zn0.9Mg0.9Si2O6:Eu2+, Mn2+, Dy3+ emitting in the near-infrared window. In order to improve the behaviour of these probes in vivo and favour diagnosis applications, we showed that biodistribution could be controlled by varying the hydrodynamic diameter, but also the surface charges and functional groups. Stealth PLNP, with neutral surface charge obtained by polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating, can circulate for longer time inside the mice body before being uptaken by the reticulo-endothelial system. However, the main drawback of this first generation of PLNP was the inability to witness long-term monitoring, mainly due to the decay kinetic after several decades of minutes, unveiling the need to work on new materials with improved optical characteristics. We investigated a modified silicate host, diopside CaMgSi2O6, and increased its persistent luminescence properties by studying various Ln3+ dopants (for instance Ce, Pr, Nd, Tm, Ho). Such dopants create electron traps that control the long lasting phosphorescence (LLP). We showed that Pr3+ was the most suitable Ln3+ electron trap in diopside lattice, providing optimal trap depth, and resulting in the most intense luminescence decay curve after UV irradiation. A novel composition CaMgSi2O6:Eu2+,Mn2+,Pr3+ was obtained for in vivo imaging, displaying a strong near-infrared persistent luminescence centred on 685 nm, allowing improved and sensitive detection through living tissues.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 March 2012
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 8263, Oxide-based Materials and Devices III, 826318 (1 March 2012); doi: 10.1117/12.909865
Show Author Affiliations
Thomas Maldiney, Unité de Pharmacologie Chimique et Génétique et d'Imagerie, CNRS, Univ. Paris Descartes (France)
Aurélie Lecointre, Lab. de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris, CNRS, Ecole Supérieure de Chimie de Paris (France)
Bruno Viana, Lab. de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris, CNRS, Ecole Supérieure de Chimie de Paris (France)
Aurélie Bessière, Lab. de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris, CNRS, Ecole Supérieure de Chimie de Paris (France)
Didier Gourier, Lab. de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris, CNRS, Ecole Supérieure de Chimie de Paris (France)
Michel Bessodes, Unité de Pharmacologie Chimique et Génétique et d'Imagerie, CNRS, Univ. Paris Descartes (France)
Cyrille Richard, Unité de Pharmacologie Chimique et Génétique et d'Imagerie, CNRS, Univ. Paris Descartes (France)
Daniel Scherman, Unité de Pharmacologie Chimique et Génétique et d'Imagerie, CNRS, Univ. Paris Descartes (France)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8263:
Oxide-based Materials and Devices III
Ferechteh H. Teherani; David C. Look; David J. Rogers, Editor(s)

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