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Proceedings Paper

High speed data encryption and decryption using stimulated Brillouin scattering effect in optical fiber
Author(s): Lilin Yi; Tao Zhang; Weisheng Hu
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Paper Abstract

A novel all-optical encryption/decryption method based on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) effect in optical fiber is proposed for the first time. The operation principle is explained in detail and the encryption and decryption performance is experimentally evaluated. The encryption keys could be the SBS gain amplitude, bandwidth, central wavelength and spectral shape, which are configurable and flexibly controlled by the users. We experimentally demonstrate the SBS encryption/decryption process of a 10.86-Gb/s non-return-to-zero (NRZ) data by using both phase-modulated and current-dithered Brillouin pumps for proof-of-concept. Unlike the traditional optical encryption methods of chaotic communications and optical code-division-multiplexing access (OCDMA), the SBS based encryption/decryption technique can directly upgrade the current optical communication system to a secure communication system without changing the terminal transceivers, which is completely compatible with the current optical communication systems.

Paper Details

Date Published: 5 December 2011
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 8198, 2011 International Conference on Optical Instruments and Technology: Optoelectronic Devices and Integration, 81980H (5 December 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.904706
Show Author Affiliations
Lilin Yi, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China)
Tao Zhang, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China)
Weisheng Hu, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8198:
2011 International Conference on Optical Instruments and Technology: Optoelectronic Devices and Integration
Xuping Zhang; P. K. Alex Wai; Hai Ming, Editor(s)

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