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Proceedings Paper

Relativity: a pillar of modern physics or a stumbling block
Author(s): Gurcharn S. Sandhu
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Paper Abstract

Currently, the theory of Relativity is being regarded as one of the main pillars of Modern Physics, essentially due to its perceived role in high energy physics, particle accelerators, relativistic quantum mechanics, and cosmology. Since the founding assumptions or postulates of Relativity and some of the resulting consequences confound the logic and common sense, a growing number of scientists are now questioning the validity of Relativity. The advent of Relativity has also ruled out the existence of the 19th century notion of ether medium or physical space as the container of physical reality. Thereby, the Newtonian notions of absolute motion, absolute time, and absolute reference frame have been replaced with the Einsteinian notions of relative motion, relative time, and inertial reference frames in relative motion. This relativity dominated viewpoint has effectively abandoned any critical study or advanced research in the detailed properties and processes of physical space for advancement of Fundamental Physics. In this paper both special theory of relativity and general relativity have been critically examined for their current relevance and future potential. We find that even though Relativity appears to be a major stumbling block in the progress of Modern Physics, the issue needs to be finally settled by a viable experiment [Phys. Essays 23, 442 (2010)] that can detect absolute motion and establish a universal reference frame.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 September 2011
PDF: 15 pages
Proc. SPIE 8121, The Nature of Light: What are Photons? IV, 812109 (29 September 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.904607
Show Author Affiliations
Gurcharn S. Sandhu, Independent Researcher (India)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8121:
The Nature of Light: What are Photons? IV
Chandrasekhar Roychoudhuri; Andrei Yu. Khrennikov; Al F. Kracklauer, Editor(s)

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