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Proceedings Paper

Optical testing of the surface quality of a variable focal length lens with null-screens
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Paper Abstract

The null-screen method has been used to test aspheric surfaces. This geometrical method measures the slope of the test surface and by a numerical integration procedure the shape of the test surface can be obtained. Now, in order to test the surfaces of a variable focal length lens (VFLL), we propose use a conical null-screen. We present the formulae to design the null-screen in such a way that the image on the CCD is a perfect array of spots; departures from this geometry are observed as deformation of the surface. The VFLL is designed in such a way that under conditions of mechanical equilibrium both surfaces are spherical; however, its shape can be easily modified mechanically changing its radius of curvature. In order to analyze the shape of the surfaces of the VFLL at different radius of curvature, we evaluate its form using a conical null-screen. This procedure allows study the deformations of the surface.

Paper Details

Date Published: 25 October 2011
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8011, 22nd Congress of the International Commission for Optics: Light for the Development of the World, 801123 (25 October 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.903392
Show Author Affiliations
Manuel Campos-García, Univ. Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico)
Agustín Santiago-Alvarado, Univ. Tecnológica de la Mixteca (Mexico)
Víctor Iván Moreno-Oliva, Univ. del Istmo (Mexico)
Rufino Díaz-Uribe, Univ. Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8011:
22nd Congress of the International Commission for Optics: Light for the Development of the World
Ramón Rodríguez-Vera; Ramón Rodríguez-Vera; Ramón Rodríguez-Vera; Rufino Díaz-Uribe; Rufino Díaz-Uribe; Rufino Díaz-Uribe, Editor(s)

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