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Proceedings Paper

New trends in intraocular lens imaging
Author(s): María S. Millán; Francisco Alba-Bueno; Fidel Vega
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Paper Abstract

As a result of modern technological advances, cataract surgery can be seen as not only a rehabilitative operation, but a customized procedure to compensate for important sources of image degradation in the visual system of a patient, such as defocus and some aberrations. With the development of new materials, instruments and surgical techniques in ophthalmology, great progress has been achieved in the imaging capability of a pseudophakic eye implanted with an intraocular lens (IOL). From the very beginning, optical design has played an essential role in this progress. New IOL designs need, on the one hand, theoretical eye models able to predict optical imaging performance and on the other hand, testing methods, verification through in vitro and in vivo measurements, and clinical validation. The implant of an IOL requires a precise biometry of the eye, a prior calculation from physiological data, and an accurate position inside the eye. Otherwise, the effects of IOL calculation errors or misplacements degrade the image very quickly. The incorporation of wavefront aberrometry into clinical ophthalmology practice has motivated new designs of IOLs to compensate for high order aberrations in some extent. Thus, for instance, IOLs with an aspheric design have the potential to improve optical performance and contrast sensitivity by reducing the positive spherical aberration of human cornea. Monofocal IOLs cause a complete loss of accommodation that requires further correction for either distance or near vision. Multifocal IOLs address this limitation using the principle of simultaneous vision. Some multifocal IOLs include a diffractive zone that covers the aperture in part or totally. Reduced image contrast and undesired visual phenomena, such as halos and glare, have been associated to the performance of multifocal IOLs. Based on a different principle, accommodating IOLs rely on the effort of the ciliary body to increase the effective power of the optical system of the eye in near vision. Finally, we present a theoretical approach that considers the modification of less conventional ocular parameters to compensate for possible refractive errors after the IOL implant.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 November 2011
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8011, 22nd Congress of the International Commission for Optics: Light for the Development of the World, 80119I (3 November 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.903389
Show Author Affiliations
María S. Millán, Technical Univ. of Catalonia (Spain)
Francisco Alba-Bueno, Technical Univ. of Catalonia (Spain)
Fidel Vega, Technical Univ. of Catalonia (Spain)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8011:
22nd Congress of the International Commission for Optics: Light for the Development of the World

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