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Proceedings Paper

Towards the development of tamper-resistant, ground-based mobile sensor nodes
Author(s): David Mascarenas; Christopher Stull; Charles Farrar
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Paper Abstract

Mobile sensor nodes hold great potential for collecting field data using fewer resources than human operators would require and potentially requiring fewer sensors than a fixed-position sensor array. It would be very beneficial to allow these mobile sensor nodes to operate unattended with a minimum of human intervention. In order to allow mobile sensor nodes to operate unattended in a field environment, it is imperative that they be capable of identifying and responding to external agents that may attempt to tamper with, damage or steal the mobile sensor nodes, while still performing their data collection mission. Potentially hostile external agents could include animals, other mobile sensor nodes, or humans. This work will focus on developing control policies to help enable a mobile sensor node to identify and avoid capture by a hostile un-mounted human. The work is developed in a simulation environment, and demonstrated using a non-holonomic, ground-based mobile sensor node. This work will be a preliminary step toward ensuring the cyber-physical security of ground-based mobile sensor nodes that operate unattended in potentially unfriendly environments.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 September 2011
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 8184, Unmanned/Unattended Sensors and Sensor Networks VIII, 81840J (29 September 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.898210
Show Author Affiliations
David Mascarenas, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Christopher Stull, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Charles Farrar, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8184:
Unmanned/Unattended Sensors and Sensor Networks VIII
Edward M. Carapezza, Editor(s)

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