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Proceedings Paper

Predicting soil erosion under land-cover area and climate changes using the revised universal soil loss equation
Author(s): Soyoung Park; Cheunggil Jin; Chuluong Choi
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Paper Abstract

Loss of soil has become a problem worldwide, and as concerns about the environment grow, active research has begun regarding soil erosion and soil-preservation polices. This study analyzed the trend of soil loss in South Korea over the past 30-year and predicted future soil loss in 2020 using the revised universal soil loss equation. In the period 1975-2005, soil loss showed an increasing trend, the 2005 value represents a 0.59 Mg/ha (2.58%) increase. Scenario 1 assumes that urban areas have a similar trend to that between 1975 and 2005 and that precipitation amount follows scenario A1B of the IPCC. The soil loss amount for 2020 land-cover map that account for the ECVAM should increase by 25.0~26.3% compared to 1975. In the case where the ECVAM is not considered, soil loss should increase by 27.7~31.8%. In Scenario 2, in which the urban area and precipitation follow the same trend as between 1975 and 2005, soil loss for 2020 land-cover map that consider the ECVAM will increase by 6.8%~7.9% compared to 1975. When the ECVAM is not considered, soil loss will increase by 9.1~12.6%. The environmental and legislative value of preservation should be considered to minimize erosion and allow for more sustainable development.

Paper Details

Date Published: 6 October 2011
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 8174, Remote Sensing for Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Hydrology XIII, 817409 (6 October 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.896325
Show Author Affiliations
Soyoung Park, Pukyong National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
Cheunggil Jin, Pukyong National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
Chuluong Choi, Pukyong National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8174:
Remote Sensing for Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Hydrology XIII
Christopher M. U. Neale; Antonino Maltese, Editor(s)

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