Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Design, assembly, and testing of a photon Doppler velocimetry probe
Author(s): Robert M. Malone; Matthew E. Briggs; Brian M. Cata; Brian C. Cox; Edward P. Daykin; Douglas O. DeVore; David L. Esquibel; Daniel K. Frayer; Brent C. Frogget; Michael R. Furlanetto; Cenobio H. Gallegos; David B. Holtkamp; Morris I. Kaufman; Kevin D. McGillivray; Peter Pazuchanics; Lori E. Primas; Vincent T. Romero; Michael A. Shinas; Danny S. Sorenson
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

A novel fiber-optic probe measures the velocity distribution of an imploding surface along many lines of sight. Reflected light from each spot on the moving surface is Doppler shifted with a small portion of this light propagating backwards through the launching fiber. The reflected light is mixed with a reference laser in a technique called photon Doppler velocimetry, providing continuous time records. Within the probe, a matrix array of 56 single-mode fibers sends light through an optical relay consisting of three types of lenses. Seven sets of these relay lenses are grouped into a close-packed array allowing the interrogation of seven regions of interest. A six-faceted prism with a hole drilled into its center directs the light beams to the different regions. Several types of relay lens systems have been evaluated, including doublets and molded aspheric singlets. The optical design minimizes beam diameters and also provides excellent imaging capabilities. One of the fiber matrix arrays can be replaced by an imaging coherent bundle. This close-packed array of seven relay systems provides up to 476 beam trajectories. The pyramid prism has its six facets polished at two different angles that will vary the density of surface point coverage. Fibers in the matrix arrays are angle polished at 8°to minimize back reflections. This causes the minimum beam waist to vary along different trajectories. Precision metrology on the direction cosine trajectories is measured to satisfy environmental requirements for vibration and temperature.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 September 2011
PDF: 14 pages
Proc. SPIE 8131, Optical System Alignment, Tolerancing, and Verification V, 813109 (12 September 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.894461
Show Author Affiliations
Robert M. Malone, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Matthew E. Briggs, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Brian M. Cata, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Brian C. Cox, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Edward P. Daykin, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Douglas O. DeVore, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
David L. Esquibel, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Daniel K. Frayer, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Brent C. Frogget, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Michael R. Furlanetto, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Cenobio H. Gallegos, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
David B. Holtkamp, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Morris I. Kaufman, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Kevin D. McGillivray, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Peter Pazuchanics, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Lori E. Primas, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Vincent T. Romero, National Security Technologies, LLC (United States)
Michael A. Shinas, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)
Danny S. Sorenson, Los Alamos National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8131:
Optical System Alignment, Tolerancing, and Verification V
José Sasián; Richard N. Youngworth, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top