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Proceedings Paper

Performance characteristics of pixelated CZT crystals used on the GammaTracker project
Author(s): Eric M. Becker; Carolyn E. Seifert; Mitchell J. Myjak; Luke E. Erikson; Scott J. Morris; Duane T. Balvage; Richard P. Lundy
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Paper Abstract

GammaTracker is a handheld radioisotope identification device in development at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that uses eighteen pixelated Cadmium-Zinc Telluride (CZT) crystals to provide energy resolution approaching that of high-purity germanium without the need for cryogenic cooling. Additionally, these crystals can be used to provide directional and imaging capabilities that cannot be found in other handheld detectors. A significant number of CZT crystals have been procured during the development of the GammaTracker system; the majority of these were procured with the same set of specifications. Each of these detectors has been characterized in terms of key parameters, including current-voltage response and pixel-by-pixel energy resolution. The results of this testing indicate that the overall quality of CZT crystals is improving over time.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 September 2011
PDF: 17 pages
Proc. SPIE 8142, Hard X-Ray, Gamma-Ray, and Neutron Detector Physics XIII, 81420F (28 September 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.894114
Show Author Affiliations
Eric M. Becker, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Carolyn E. Seifert, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Mitchell J. Myjak, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Luke E. Erikson, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Scott J. Morris, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Duane T. Balvage, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)
Richard P. Lundy, Pacific Northwest National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8142:
Hard X-Ray, Gamma-Ray, and Neutron Detector Physics XIII
Larry A. Franks; Ralph B. James; Arnold Burger, Editor(s)

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