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Proceedings Paper

Driving experience and special skills reflected in eye movements
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Paper Abstract

When driving a vehicle, people use the central vision both to plan ahead and monitor their performance feedback (research by Donges, 1978 [1], and after). Discussion is ongoing if making eye movements do more than gathering information. Moving eyes may also prepare the following body movements like steering. Different paradigms exist to explore vision in driving. Our perspective was to quantify eye movements and fixation patterns of different proficiency individuals, a driving learner, a novice, an experienced driver and a European level car racer. Thus for safety reasons we started by asking them to follow a video tour through a known city, remote from an infrared eye tracker sampling at 250 Hz. We report that gaze strategy of an experienced driver differs qualitatively from that of an automobile sports master. Quantitative differences only were found between the latter and a driving learner or a novice driver. Experience in a motor action provides skills different from sports training. We are aiming at testing this finding in real world driving.

Paper Details

Date Published: 16 September 2011
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 8155, Infrared Sensors, Devices, and Applications; and Single Photon Imaging II, 815516 (16 September 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.892530
Show Author Affiliations
Roberts Paeglis, Institute of Physical Research and Biomechanics (Latvia)
Kristaps Bluss, Institute of Physical Research and Biomechanics (Latvia)
Aigars Atvars, Institute of Physical Research and Biomechanics (Latvia)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8155:
Infrared Sensors, Devices, and Applications; and Single Photon Imaging II
Manijeh Razeghi; Paul D. LeVan; Ashok K. Sood; Priyalal S. Wijewarnasuriya, Editor(s)

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