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Proceedings Paper

Tin oxide nanowire sensors for highly sensitive detection of the toxic gas H2S
Author(s): A. Köck; E. Brunet; G. C. Mutinati; T. Maier; S. Steinhauer
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Paper Abstract

We have realized gas sensor devices, which are based on a single SnO2-nanowire or a multiple SnO2-nanowire network as gas sensing components and are very sensitive to the toxic gas H2S. The nanowires are fabricated in a two-step atmospheric pressure synthesis process directly on the Si-chip by spray pyrolysis and subsequent annealing. Exposure of the single SnO2-nanowire sensor H2S with a concentration of only 1.4 ppm decreases the resistance by ~ 30%, while the multiple SnO2-nanowire network sensor exhibits a resistance decrease by ~ 90%. The nanowire sensors have extraordinary sensitivity with resolution limit in the ppb range and are able to measure concentrations well below the threshold limit value of 10 ppm. Due to their high performance the nanowire based sensors are basically suited for the realization of smart gas sensing devices for personal safety issues as well as industrial applications.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 May 2011
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 8024, Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies VIII, 80240S (26 May 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.883899
Show Author Affiliations
A. Köck, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH (Austria)
E. Brunet, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH (Austria)
G. C. Mutinati, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH (Austria)
T. Maier, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH (Austria)
S. Steinhauer, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH (Austria)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8024:
Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies VIII
Tuan Vo-Dinh; Robert A. Lieberman; Günter Gauglitz, Editor(s)

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