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Proceedings Paper

Microalgae photonics
Author(s): Timmy Floume; Thomas Coquil; Julien Sylvestre
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Paper Abstract

Due to their metabolic flexibility and fast growth rate, microscopic aquatic phototrophs like algae have a potential to become industrial photochemical converters. Algae photosynthesis could enable the large scale production of clean and renewable liquid fuels and chemicals with major environmental, economic and societal benefits. Capital and operational costs are the main issues to address through optical, process and biochemical engineering improvements. In this perspective, a variety of photonic approaches have been proposed - we introduce them here and describe their potential, limitations and compatibility with separate biotechnology and engineering progresses. We show that only sunlight-based approaches are economically realistic. One of photonics' main goals in the algae field is to dilute light to overcome photosaturation effects that impact upon cultures exposed to full sunlight. Among other approaches, we introduce a widely-compatible broadband spectral adaptation technique called AlgoSun® that uses luminescence to optimize sunlight spectrum in view of the bioconverter's requirements.

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 April 2011
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 8065, SPIE Eco-Photonics 2011: Sustainable Design, Manufacturing, and Engineering Workforce Education for a Green Future, 80650C (20 April 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.883380
Show Author Affiliations
Timmy Floume, Imperial College London, South Kensington (United Kingdom)
Thomas Coquil, PhotoFuel SAS (France)
Julien Sylvestre, PhotoFuel SAS (France)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 8065:
SPIE Eco-Photonics 2011: Sustainable Design, Manufacturing, and Engineering Workforce Education for a Green Future
Pierre Ambs; Dan Curticapean; Claus Emmelmann; Wolfgang Knapp; Zbigniew T. Kuznicki; Patrick P. Meyrueis, Editor(s)

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