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Proceedings Paper

Using fractal analysis of thermal signatures for thyroid disease evaluation
Author(s): Gheorghe Gavriloaia; Emil Sofron; Mariuca-Roxana Gavriloaia; Adina-Mariana Ghemigean
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Paper Abstract

The skin is the largest organ of the body and it protects against heat, light, injury and infection. Skin temperature is an important parameter for diagnosing diseases. Thermal analysis is non-invasive, painless, and relatively inexpensive, showing a great potential research. Since the thyroid regulates metabolic rate it is intimately connected to body temperature, more than, any modification of its function generates a specific thermal image on the neck skin. The shapes of thermal signatures are often irregular in size and shape. Euclidean geometry is not able to evaluate their shape for different thyroid diseases, and fractal geometry is used in this paper. Different thyroid diseases generate different shapes, and their complexity are evaluated by specific mathematical approaches, fractal analysis, in order to the evaluate selfsimilarity and lacunarity. Two kinds of thyroid diseases, hyperthyroidism and papillary cancer are analyzed in this paper. The results are encouraging and show the ability to continue research for thermal signature to be used in early diagnosis of thyroid diseases.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 December 2010
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 7821, Advanced Topics in Optoelectronics, Microelectronics, and Nanotechnologies V, 78211O (4 December 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.882294
Show Author Affiliations
Gheorghe Gavriloaia, Univ. of Pitesti (Romania)
Emil Sofron, Univ. of Pitesti (Romania)
Mariuca-Roxana Gavriloaia, Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. of Bucharest (Romania)
Adina-Mariana Ghemigean, Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. of Bucharest (Romania)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7821:
Advanced Topics in Optoelectronics, Microelectronics, and Nanotechnologies V
Paul Schiopu; George Caruntu, Editor(s)

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