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Proceedings Paper

Space perception in pictures
Author(s): Andrea J. van Doorn; Johan Wagemans; Huib de Ridder; Jan J. Koenderink
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Paper Abstract

A picture" is a at object covered with pigments in a certain pattern. Human observers, when looking "into" a picture (photograph, painting, drawing, . . . say) often report to experience a three-dimensional "pictorial space." This space is a mental entity, apparently triggered by so called pictorial cues. The latter are sub-structures of color patterns that are pre-consciously designated by the observer as "cues," and that are often considered to play a crucial role in the construction of pictorial space. In the case of the visual arts these structures are often introduced by the artist with the intention to trigger certain experiences in prospective viewers, whereas in the case of photographs the intentionality is limited to the viewer. We have explored various methods to operationalize geometrical properties, typically relative to some observer perspective. Here perspective" is to be understood in a very general, not necessarily geometric sense, akin to Gombrich's beholder's share". Examples include pictorial depth, either in a metrical, or a mere ordinal sense. We nd that different observers tend to agree remarkably well on ordinal relations, but show dramatic differences in metrical relations.

Paper Details

Date Published: 4 February 2011
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 7865, Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XVI, 786519 (4 February 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.882076
Show Author Affiliations
Andrea J. van Doorn, Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands)
Johan Wagemans, Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium)
Huib de Ridder, Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands)
Jan J. Koenderink, Katholieke Univ. Leuven (Belgium)
Technische Univ. Delft (Netherlands)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7865:
Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XVI
Bernice E. Rogowitz; Thrasyvoulos N. Pappas, Editor(s)

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