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Proceedings Paper

How 3D immersive visualization is changing medical diagnostics
Author(s): Anton H. J. Koning
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Paper Abstract

Originally the only way to look inside the human body without opening it up was by means of two dimensional (2D) images obtained using X-ray equipment. The fact that human anatomy is inherently three dimensional leads to ambiguities in interpretation and problems of occlusion. Three dimensional (3D) imaging modalities such as CT, MRI and 3D ultrasound remove these drawbacks and are now part of routine medical care. While most hospitals 'have gone digital', meaning that the images are no longer printed on film, they are still being viewed on 2D screens. However, this way valuable depth information is lost, and some interactions become unnecessarily complex or even unfeasible. Using a virtual reality (VR) system to present volumetric data means that depth information is presented to the viewer and 3D interaction is made possible. At the Erasmus MC we have developed V-Scope, an immersive volume visualization system for visualizing a variety of (bio-)medical volumetric datasets, ranging from 3D ultrasound, via CT and MRI, to confocal microscopy, OPT and 3D electron-microscopy data. In this talk we will address the advantages of such a system for both medical diagnostics as well as for (bio)medical research.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 February 2011
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 7865, Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XVI, 786503 (3 February 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.881511
Show Author Affiliations
Anton H. J. Koning, Erasmus MC (Netherlands)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7865:
Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XVI
Bernice E. Rogowitz; Thrasyvoulos N. Pappas, Editor(s)

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