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Proceedings Paper

PharmaSat: drug dose response in microgravity from a free-flying integrated biofluidic/optical culture-and-analysis satellite
Author(s): Antonio J. Ricco; Macarena Parra; David Niesel; Matthew Piccini; Diana Ly; Michael McGinnis; Andrzej Kudlicki; John W. Hines; Linda Timucin; Chris Beasley; Robert Ricks; Michael McIntyre; Charlie Friedericks; Michael Henschke; Ricky Leung; Millan Diaz-Aguado; Christopher Kitts; Ignacio Mas; Mike Rasay; Elwood Agasid; Ed Luzzi; Karolyn Ronzano; David Squires; Bruce Yost
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Paper Abstract

We designed, built, tested, space-qualified, launched, and collected telemetered data from low Earth orbit from Pharma- Sat, a 5.1-kg free flying "nanosatellite" that supported microbial growth in 48 microfluidic wells, dosed microbes with multiple concentrations of a pharmaceutical agent, and monitored microbial growth and metabolic activity using a dedicated 3-color optical absorbance system at each microwell. The PharmaSat nanosatellite comprised a structure approximately 10 x 10 x 35 cm, including triple-junction solar cells, bidirectional communications, power-generation and energy- storage system, and a sealed payload 1.2-L containment vessel that housed the biological organisms along with the fluidic, optical, thermal, sensor, and electronic subsystems. Growth curves for S. cerevisiae (Brewer's yeast) were obtained for multiple concentrations of the antifungal drug voriconazole in the microgravity conditions of low Earth orbit. Corresponding terrestrial control experiments were conducted for comparison.

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 February 2011
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 7929, Microfluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems IX, 79290T (15 February 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.881082
Show Author Affiliations
Antonio J. Ricco, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Macarena Parra, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
David Niesel, The Univ. of Texas Medical Branch (United States)
Matthew Piccini, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Diana Ly, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Michael McGinnis, The Univ. of Texas Medical Branch (United States)
Andrzej Kudlicki, The Univ. of Texas Medical Branch (United States)
John W. Hines, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Linda Timucin, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Chris Beasley, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Robert Ricks, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Michael McIntyre, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Charlie Friedericks, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Michael Henschke, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Ricky Leung, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Millan Diaz-Aguado, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Christopher Kitts, Santa Clara Univ. (United States)
Ignacio Mas, Santa Clara Univ. (United States)
Mike Rasay, Santa Clara Univ. (United States)
Elwood Agasid, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Ed Luzzi, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Karolyn Ronzano, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
David Squires, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)
Bruce Yost, NASA Ames Research Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7929:
Microfluidics, BioMEMS, and Medical Microsystems IX
Holger Becker; Bonnie L. Gray, Editor(s)

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