Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

In service damage assessment of bonded composite repairs with full field thermographic techniques
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

Thermographic techniques offer distinct advantages over other techniques usually employed to assess damage accumulation and propagation. Among the advantages of these techniques are the fully remote-non contact monitoring and their ability for full field imaging. Due to the transient nature of the heat transfer phenomenon, phase and lock-in techniques are of particular interest in order to increase the resolution of the signal or provide depth discrimination. Last but not least, when a structure is subjected to load, these techniques can be used in order to monitor the irreversible damage phenomena, as manifested by the local heat accumulation in the vicinity of the defect. This eliminates the need for external heat source, as any cyclic loading can induce the heat gradient necessary to pinpoint the defect accumulation and propagation. In the aforementioned context, lock-in thermography has been employed to monitor the delamination propagation in composites and the critical failure of bonded repairs when the materials are subjected to fatigue loading. Lock-in thermography proved successful in identifying debonding initiation and propagation as well in depicting the thermoelastic stress field around purposely induced discontinuities.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 April 2011
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 7983, Nondestructive Characterization for Composite Materials, Aerospace Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Homeland Security 2011, 79831U (19 April 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.880376
Show Author Affiliations
A. S. Paipetis, Univ. of Ioannina (Greece)
S. A. Grammatikos, Univ. of Ioannina (Greece)
E. Z. Kordatos, Univ. of Ioannina (Greece)
N.-M. Barkoula, Univ. of Ioannina (Greece)
T. E. Matikas, Univ. of Ioannina (Greece)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7983:
Nondestructive Characterization for Composite Materials, Aerospace Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Homeland Security 2011
H. Felix Wu, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top