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Proceedings Paper

Using tensor-based morphometry to detect structural brain abnormalities in rats with adolescent intermittent alcohol exposure
Author(s): Beatriz Paniagua; Cindy Ehlers; Fulton Crews; Francois Budin; Garrett Larson; Martin Styner; Ipek Oguz
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Paper Abstract

Understanding the effects of adolescent binge drinking that persist into adulthood is a crucial public health issue. Adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure (AIE) is an animal model that can be used to investigate these effects in rodents. In this work, we investigate the application of a particular image analysis technique, tensor-based morphometry, for detecting anatomical differences between AIE and control rats using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). Deformation field analysis is a popular method for detecting volumetric changes analyzing Jacobian determinants calculated on deformation fields. Recent studies showed that computing deformation field metrics on the full deformation tensor, often referred to as tensor-based morphometry (TBM), increases the sensitivity to anatomical differences. In this paper we conduct a comprehensive TBM study for precisely locating differences between control and AIE rats. Using a DTI RARE sequence designed for minimal geometric distortion, 12-directional images were acquired postmortem for control and AIE rats (n=9). After preprocessing, average images for the two groups were constructed using an unbiased atlas building approach. We non-rigidly register the two atlases using Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping, and analyze the resulting deformation field using TBM. In particular, we evaluate the tensor determinant, geodesic anisotropy, and deformation direction vector (DDV) on the deformation field to detect structural differences. This yields data on the local amount of growth, shrinkage and the directionality of deformation between the groups. We show that TBM can thus be used to measure group morphological differences between rat populations, demonstrating the potential of the proposed framework.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 March 2011
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 7965, Medical Imaging 2011: Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging, 79650R (9 March 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.878389
Show Author Affiliations
Beatriz Paniagua, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Cindy Ehlers, The Scripps Research Institute (United States)
Fulton Crews, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Francois Budin, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Garrett Larson, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Martin Styner, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Ipek Oguz, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7965:
Medical Imaging 2011: Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging
John B. Weaver; Robert C. Molthen, Editor(s)

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