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Proceedings Paper

Improvement of MS (multiple sclerosis) CAD (computer aided diagnosis) performance using C/C++ and computing engine in the graphical processing unit (GPU)
Author(s): Joohyung Suh; Kevin Ma; Anh Le
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Paper Abstract

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease which is caused by damaged myelin around axons of the brain and spinal cord. Currently, MR Imaging is used for diagnosis, but it is very highly variable and time-consuming since the lesion detection and estimation of lesion volume are performed manually. For this reason, we developed a CAD (Computer Aided Diagnosis) system which would assist segmentation of MS to facilitate physician's diagnosis. The MS CAD system utilizes K-NN (k-nearest neighbor) algorithm to detect and segment the lesion volume in an area based on the voxel. The prototype MS CAD system was developed under the MATLAB environment. Currently, the MS CAD system consumes a huge amount of time to process data. In this paper we will present the development of a second version of MS CAD system which has been converted into C/C++ in order to take advantage of the GPU (Graphical Processing Unit) which will provide parallel computation. With the realization of C/C++ and utilizing the GPU, we expect to cut running time drastically. The paper investigates the conversion from MATLAB to C/C++ and the utilization of a high-end GPU for parallel computing of data to improve algorithm performance of MS CAD.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 March 2011
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 7967, Medical Imaging 2011: Advanced PACS-based Imaging Informatics and Therapeutic Applications, 79670V (24 March 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.878334
Show Author Affiliations
Joohyung Suh, The Univ. of Southern California (United States)
Kevin Ma, The Univ. of Southern California (United States)
Anh Le, The Univ. of Southern California (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7967:
Medical Imaging 2011: Advanced PACS-based Imaging Informatics and Therapeutic Applications
William W. Boonn; Brent J. Liu, Editor(s)

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