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Proceedings Paper

Three-dimensional computer simulation of high-frequency ultrasound imaging of healthy and cancerous murine liver tissues
Author(s): Mohammad I. Daoud; James C. Lacefield
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Paper Abstract

Substantial progress has been made towards using high-frequency (20-60 MHz) ultrasound to track tumor growth in preclinical cancer models; however, correlation of high-frequency backscattering to tissue microanatomy is an incompletely understood problem. In this paper, a histology-based simulation framework is presented to relate high-frequency backscattering to tissue microanatomy. The software employs a three-dimensional (3-D) microanatomical model that treats tissue as a population of nuclei embedded in a homogeneous cytoplasm to create simulated healthy tissue and simulated tumor that match the nuclei number density, sizes of nuclei, and spatial arrangement of nuclei of a healthy mouse liver and an experimental liver metastasis. A parallel first-order k-space method is used to synthesize B-mode images by computing linear 3-D propagation of focused 40-MHz pulses in the simulated tissues. Gray-level histograms with 13 bins evenly spaced over 256 gray levels are constructed for the simulated images and compared with histograms of corresponding experimental images. The histogram of the simulated healthy tissue matches the histogram of the healthy liver within one standard deviation in all 13 bins when the sound speed and mass density of the nuclei are set to 1503 m/s and 1430 kg/m3. Simulated and experimental speckle distributions for the liver metastasis match in 11 of 13 bins when the sound speed and density of the nuclei are set to 1527 m/s and 1140.5 kg/m3. The simulations suggest that variations in first-order speckle statistics between healthy and cancerous murine liver tissues reflect changes in both tissue acoustic and structural properties.

Paper Details

Date Published: 25 March 2011
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 7968, Medical Imaging 2011: Ultrasonic Imaging, Tomography, and Therapy, 79680H (25 March 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.877855
Show Author Affiliations
Mohammad I. Daoud, Robarts Research Institute (Canada)
The Univ. of Western Ontario (Canada)
James C. Lacefield, Robarts Research Institute (Canada)
The Univ. of Western Ontario (Canada)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7968:
Medical Imaging 2011: Ultrasonic Imaging, Tomography, and Therapy
Jan D'hooge; Marvin M. Doyley, Editor(s)

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