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Proceedings Paper

Ultrasound-induced cellular uptake of plasmonic gold nanorods
Author(s): Alexander Hannah; Katheryne Wilson; Kimberly Homan; Stanislav Emelianov
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Paper Abstract

Delivery of contrast agents and their interaction with cells is emerging as an important tool in cancer imaging and therapy. An alternative to traditional molecular targeting schemes that induce endocytotic uptake of contrast agents in cells is presented here. Specifically, the application of high-intensity, focused ultrasound (HIFU) was used to enhance uptake of gold nanorods in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. A significant increase was observed in gold nanorod uptake when cells were incubated with nanorods and treated with HIFU. Additionally, inclusion of liquid-filled, perfluorocarbon (PFC) microdroplets in cell samples incubated with nanorods and treated with HIFU exhibited greater uptake of gold over those samples exposed to HIFU without microdroplets. Furthermore, the level of acoustic pressure required to increase nanoparticle uptake did not significantly decrease cell viability. Therefore, improved intracellular delivery of nanoparticle contrast agents is possible using HIFU without compromising cell viability. Since nanoparticle delivery is mechanically induced, this method can apply to a broad range of cancer imaging and therapy applications.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 February 2011
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 7899, Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2011, 789920 (28 February 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.875368
Show Author Affiliations
Alexander Hannah, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Katheryne Wilson, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Kimberly Homan, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Stanislav Emelianov, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7899:
Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2011
Alexander A. Oraevsky; Lihong V. Wang, Editor(s)

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