Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of lymphatics in head and neck lymphedema
Author(s): I-Chih Tan; Erik A. Maus; John C. Rasmussen; Milton V. Marshall; Caroline E. Fife; Latisha A. Smith; Eva M. Sevick-Muraca
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

Treatment of lymphatic disease is complicated and controversial, due in part to the limited understanding of the lymphatic system. Lymphedema (LE) is a frequent complication after surgical resection and radiation treatment in cancer survivors, and is especially debilitating in regions where treatment options are limited. Although some extremity LE can be effectively treated with manual lymphatic drainage (MLD) therapy or compression devices to direct proximal lymph transport, head and neck LE is more challenging, due to complicated geometry and complex lymphatic structure in head and neck region. Herein, we describe the compassionate use of an investigatory technique of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging to understand the lymphatic anatomy and function, and to help direct MLD in a patient with head and neck LE. Immediately after 9 intradermal injections of 25 μg indocyanine green each around the face and neck region, NIR fluorescence images were collected using a custom-built imaging system with diffused excitation light illumination. These images were then used to direct MLD therapy. In addition, 3-dimensional (3D) surface profilometry was used to monitor response to therapy. NIR fluorescence images of functioning lymphatic vessels and abnormal structures were obtained. Precise geometries of facial structures were obtained using 3D profilometry, and detection of small changes in edema between therapy sessions was achieved. NIR fluorescence imaging provides a mapping of lymphatic architecture to direct MLD therapy and thus improve treatment efficacy in the head and neck LE, while 3D profilometry allowed longitudinal assessment of edema to evaluate the efficacy of therapy.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 February 2011
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 7890, Advanced Biomedical and Clinical Diagnostic Systems IX, 78900K (21 February 2011); doi: 10.1117/12.873673
Show Author Affiliations
I-Chih Tan, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)
Erik A. Maus, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)
Memorial Hermann Ctr. for Lymphedema Management (United States)
John C. Rasmussen, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)
Milton V. Marshall, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)
Caroline E. Fife, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)
Memorial Hermann Ctr. for Lymphedema Management (United States)
Latisha A. Smith, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)
Memorial Hermann Ctr. for Lymphedema Management (United States)
Eva M. Sevick-Muraca, The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7890:
Advanced Biomedical and Clinical Diagnostic Systems IX
Anita Mahadevan-Jansen; Tuan Vo-Dinh; Warren S. Grundfest, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top