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Proceedings Paper

Variations in ecological service value in Beijing from 1990 to 2006 based on remote sensing
Author(s): Yonghua Sun; Xiaojuan Li; Huili Gong; Yihan Wang
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Paper Abstract

Ecological services are defined as the conditions and processes through which natural ecosystems and the species that comprise them, sustain and fulfill human life, or the goods and services provided by ecosystem which contribute to human welfare, both directly and indirectly. Ecological service value has been a hot topic in ecological economic research. Beijing, the capital of China, covers an area of more than 16,410 square kilometers and has a population of 14.93 million people. It's also a fast-growing city with rapid urbanization, which may significantly impact ecological services and functions. Such effects are difficult to quantify and are seldom taken into account in the policy making process. So this article tried a technical process for calculating the ecological service value based on remote sensing. Then the article estimated variations in ecological services value in response to land use changes in Beijing from 1990 to 2006, and provided useful information and advice to policy-making for sustainable development of ecological environment.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 November 2010
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 7841, Sixth International Symposium on Digital Earth: Data Processing and Applications, 78411X (3 November 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.873345
Show Author Affiliations
Yonghua Sun, Capital Normal Univ. (China)
Xiaojuan Li, Capital Normal Univ. (China)
Huili Gong, Capital Normal Univ. (China)
Yihan Wang, Capital Normal Univ. (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7841:
Sixth International Symposium on Digital Earth: Data Processing and Applications
Huadong Guo; Changlin Wang, Editor(s)

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