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Proceedings Paper

Algorithm for estimating the chlorophyll-a concentrations in water areas with different qualities from satellite data
Author(s): Takashi Aoyama
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Paper Abstract

The purpose of this study is to develop an algorithm for estimating the chlorophyll-a concentrations of relatively clean coastal waters and highly eutrophic lakes from multispectral satellite images (ALOS/AVNIR-2) and field survey data. Obama Bay has a low chlorophyll-a concentration (<10 mg/m3). In contrast, Lake Kitagata is a brackish, eutrophic lake that is connected to the Japan Sea in the northeast, and it has a chlorophyll-a concentration in the range 10 to 200 mg/m3. For both water areas, the correlation coefficients between various ratios of satellite spectral bands and field survey data are calculated to determine the most suitable algorithm for estimating chlorophyll-a concentration. The preliminary results indicate that an algorithm using visible bands (bands 1, 2, and 3 for ALOS/AVNIR-2) have high correlation coefficients for Obama Bay, whereas an algorithm using the near-infrared band (band 4) is suitable for Lake Kitagata when it is highly eutrophic. These results indicate that water with a low chlorophyll-a concentration has a low near-infrared spectral reflectance, because of the strong absorption of light by water in near-infrared wavelengths.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 November 2010
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 7858, Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean, Land, and Atmosphere Environment, 785819 (9 November 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.869442
Show Author Affiliations
Takashi Aoyama, Fukui Univ. of Technology (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7858:
Remote Sensing of the Coastal Ocean, Land, and Atmosphere Environment
Robert J. Frouin; Hong Rhyong Yoo; Joong-Sun Won; Aiping Feng, Editor(s)

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