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Proceedings Paper

Hydrogen sensing with optical microfibers coated with Pd/Au nanoparticles
Author(s): David Monzón-Hernández; Donato Luna-Moreno; Dalia Martínez-Escobar; Joel Villatoro
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Paper Abstract

Optical microfibers decorated with PdAu nanoparticles are proposed for fast hydrogen sensing. The microfibers were obtained by simply tapering conventional telecommunications fiber down to dimensions comparable to the wavelength of the guided light. A few millimeters of the microfiber were coated with a PdAu layer in island form by depositing the layer at low evaporation rate (0.1 Å/s). Then the islands were grown with a thermal annealing process until composite nanoparticles were formed. The PdAu nanoparticles deposited on the optical microfibers experience optical and physical changes when they exposed to hydrogen. This gives rise to reversible transmission changes with an unusual pulsed like behavior which is attributed to scattering of the guided light. The devices are promising for detecting low concentrations of hydrogen (up to 8%) at room temperature with response and recovery times on the order of seconds.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 October 2010
PDF: 4 pages
Proc. SPIE 7839, 2nd Workshop on Specialty Optical Fibers and Their Applications (WSOF-2), 78390I (14 October 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.867924
Show Author Affiliations
David Monzón-Hernández, Ctr. de Investigaciones en Óptica, A.C. (Mexico)
Donato Luna-Moreno, Ctr. de Investigaciones en Óptica, A.C. (Mexico)
Dalia Martínez-Escobar, Ctr. de Investigaciones en Óptica, A.C. (Mexico)
Joel Villatoro, ICFO-Institut de Ciències Fotòniques (Spain)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7839:
2nd Workshop on Specialty Optical Fibers and Their Applications (WSOF-2)
Juan Hernández-Cordero; Ismael Torres-Gómez; Alexis Méndez, Editor(s)

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