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Proceedings Paper

Millimeter-order imaging technique from 100 keV to MeV based on germanium Compton camera
Author(s): Shin'ichiro Takeda; Tomonori Fukuchi; Yousuke Kanayama; Shinji Motomura; Makoto Hiromura; Tadayuki Takahashi; Shuichi Enomoto
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Paper Abstract

A prototype molecular imaging system that features wide-band imaging capability from 100 keV to MeV was developed based on a germanium Compton camera. In this system, radiotracer imaging is performed through the Compton imaging technique above 300 keV and through the coded mask imaging technique below 200 keV. For practical use, small animal imaging requires spatial resolution of the order of millimeters. We conducted tests with a multiple-well phantom containing 99mTc (140 keV) and 54Mn (834 keV), and confirmed the spatial resolution of better than 3.2 mm for the phantom placed 35 mm above the detector. We also report imaging results of a living mouse into which we injected 99mTc (140 keV) and 54Mn (834 keV).

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 August 2010
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 7805, Hard X-Ray, Gamma-Ray, and Neutron Detector Physics XII, 780515 (27 August 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.865333
Show Author Affiliations
Shin'ichiro Takeda, RIKEN Ctr. for Molecular Imaging Science (Japan)
Tomonori Fukuchi, RIKEN Ctr. for Molecular Imaging Science (Japan)
Yousuke Kanayama, RIKEN Ctr. for Molecular Imaging Science (Japan)
Shinji Motomura, RIKEN Ctr. for Molecular Imaging Science (Japan)
Makoto Hiromura, RIKEN Ctr. for Molecular Imaging Science (Japan)
Tadayuki Takahashi, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
Shuichi Enomoto, RIKEN Ctr. for Molecular Imaging Science (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7805:
Hard X-Ray, Gamma-Ray, and Neutron Detector Physics XII
Arnold Burger; Larry A. Franks; Ralph B. James, Editor(s)

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