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Proceedings Paper

HARMONI: a single-field wide-band integral-field spectrograph for the European ELT
Author(s): Niranjan Thatte; Mathias Tecza; Fraser Clarke; Roger L. Davies; Alban Remillieux; Roland Bacon; David Lunney; Santiago Arribas; Evencio Mediavilla; Fernando Gago; Naidu Bezawada; Pierre Ferruit; Ana Fragoso; David Freeman; Javier Fuentes; Thierry Fusco; Angus Gallie; Adolfo Garcia; Timothy Goodsall; Felix Gracia; Aurelien Jarno; Johan Kosmalski; James Lynn; Stuart McLay; David Montgomery; Arlette Pecontal; Hermine Schnetler; Harry Smith; Dario Sosa; Giuseppina Battaglia; Neil Bowles; Luis Colina; Eric Emsellem; Ana Garcia-Perez; Szymon Gladysz; Isobel Hook; Patrick Irwin; Matt Jarvis; Robert Kennicutt; Andrew Levan; Andy Longmore; John Magorrian; Mark McCaughrean; Livia Origlia; Rafael Rebolo; Dimitra Rigopoulou; Sean Ryan; Mark Swinbank; Nial Tanvir; Eline Tolstoy; Aprajita Verma
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Paper Abstract

We describe the results of a Phase A study for a single field, wide band, near-infrared integral field spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). HARMONI, the High Angular Resolution Monolithic Optical & Nearinfrared Integral field spectrograph, provides the E-ELT's core spectroscopic requirement. It is a work-horse instrument, with four different spatial scales, ranging from seeing to diffraction-limited, and spectral resolving powers of 4000, 10000 & 20000 covering the 0.47 to 2.45 μm wavelength range. It is optimally suited to carry out a wide range of observing programs, focusing on detailed, spatially resolved studies of extended objects to unravel their morphology, kinematics and chemical composition, whilst also enabling ultra-sensitive observations of point sources. We present a synopsis of the key science cases motivating the instrument, the top level specifications, a description of the opto-mechanical concept, operation and calibration plan, and image quality and throughput budgets. Issues of expected performance, complementarity and synergies, as well as simulated observations are presented elsewhere in these proceedings[1].

Paper Details

Date Published: 15 July 2010
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 7735, Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy III, 77352I (15 July 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.857445
Show Author Affiliations
Niranjan Thatte, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Mathias Tecza, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Fraser Clarke, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Roger L. Davies, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Alban Remillieux, Ctr. de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS, Observatoire de Lyon (France)
Roland Bacon, Ctr. de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS, Observatoire de Lyon (France)
David Lunney, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., The Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Santiago Arribas, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain)
Evencio Mediavilla, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain)
Fernando Gago, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
Naidu Bezawada, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., The Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Pierre Ferruit, Observatoire de Lyon (France)
Ana Fragoso, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain)
David Freeman, Kidger Optics Associates (United Kingdom)
Javier Fuentes, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain)
Thierry Fusco, ONERA (France)
Angus Gallie, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., The Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Adolfo Garcia, SENER Ingenieria y Systemas (Spain)
Timothy Goodsall, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Felix Gracia, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain)
Aurelien Jarno, Ctr. de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS, Observatoire de Lyon (France)
Johan Kosmalski, Ctr. de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS, Observatoire de Lyon (France)
James Lynn, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Stuart McLay, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., The Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
David Montgomery, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., The Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Arlette Pecontal, Ctr. de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, CNRS, Observatoire de Lyon (France)
Hermine Schnetler, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., The Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
Harry Smith, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Dario Sosa, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain)
Giuseppina Battaglia, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
Neil Bowles, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Luis Colina, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (Spain)
Eric Emsellem, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
Ana Garcia-Perez, Univ.of Hertfordshire (United Kingdom)
Szymon Gladysz, European Southern Observatory (Germany)
Isobel Hook, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Patrick Irwin, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Matt Jarvis, Univ. of Hertfordshire (United Kingdom)
Robert Kennicutt, Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)
Andrew Levan, Univ. of Warwick (United Kingdom)
Andy Longmore, UK Astronomy Technology Ctr., The Royal Observatory Edinburgh (United Kingdom)
John Magorrian, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Mark McCaughrean, European Space Research and Technology Ctr. (Netherlands)
Livia Origlia, INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna (Italy)
Rafael Rebolo, Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain)
Dimitra Rigopoulou, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)
Sean Ryan, Univ. of Hertfordshire (United Kingdom)
Mark Swinbank, Durham Univ. (United Kingdom)
Nial Tanvir, Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom)
Eline Tolstoy, Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)
Aprajita Verma, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7735:
Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy III
Ian S. McLean; Suzanne K. Ramsay; Hideki Takami, Editor(s)

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