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Proceedings Paper

Optical testing of the LSST combined primary/tertiary mirror
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Paper Abstract

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) utilizes a three-mirror design in which the primary (M1) and tertiary (M3) mirrors are two concentric aspheric surfaces on one monolithic substrate. The substrate material is Ohara E6 borosilicate glass, in a honeycomb sandwich configuration, currently in production at The University of Arizona's Steward Observatory Mirror Lab. In addition to the normal requirements for smooth surfaces of the appropriate prescriptions, the alignment of the two surfaces must be accurately measured and controlled in the production lab. Both the pointing and centration of the two optical axes are important parameters, in addition to the axial spacing of the two vertices. This paper describes the basic metrology systems for each surface, with particular attention to the alignment of the two surfaces. These surfaces are aspheric enough to require null correctors for each wavefront. Both M1 and M3 are concave surfaces with both non-zero conic constants and higher-order terms (6th order for M1 and both 6th and 8th orders for M3). M1 is hyperboloidal and can utilize a standard Offner null corrector. M3 is an oblate ellipsoid, so has positive spherical aberration. We have chosen to place a phase-etched computer-generated hologram (CGH) between the mirror surface and the center-of-curvature (CoC), whereas the M1 null lens is beyond the CoC. One relatively new metrology tool is the laser tracker, which is relied upon to measure the alignment and spacings. A separate laser tracker system will be used to measure both surfaces during loose abrasive grinding and initial polishing.

Paper Details

Date Published: 23 July 2010
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 7739, Modern Technologies in Space- and Ground-based Telescopes and Instrumentation, 77392V (23 July 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.857358
Show Author Affiliations
Michael T. Tuell, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
Hubert M. Martin, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
James H. Burge, Steward Observatory, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
College of Optical Sciences, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)
William J. Gressler, National Optical Astronomy Observatory (United States)
Chunyu Zhao, College of Optical Sciences, The Univ. of Arizona (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7739:
Modern Technologies in Space- and Ground-based Telescopes and Instrumentation
Eli Atad-Ettedgui; Dietrich Lemke, Editor(s)

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