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Proceedings Paper

MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics
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Paper Abstract

We report on the development of high actuator count, micro-electromechanical (MEMS) deformable mirrors designed for high order wavefront correction in ground and space-based astronomical adaptive optics instruments. The design of these polysilicon, surface-micromachined MEMS deformable mirrors builds on technology that has been used extensively to correct for ocular aberrations in retinal imaging systems and for compensation of atmospheric turbulence in free-space laser communication. These light-weight, low power deformable mirrors have an active aperture of up to 25.2mm consisting of a thin silicon membrane mirror supported by an array of 140 to 4092 electrostatic actuators which exhibit no hysteresis and have sub-nanometer repeatability making them well suited for open-loop control applications such as Multi-Object Adaptive Optics (MOAO). The continuous membrane deformable mirrors, coated with a highly reflective metal film, are capable of up to 6μm of stroke, have a surface finish of <10nm RMS with a fill factor of 99.8%. Presented in this paper are device characteristics and performance test results, as well as reliability test data and device lifetime predictions that show that trillions of actuator cycles can be achieved without failures.

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 July 2010
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 7736, Adaptive Optics Systems II, 77362D (28 July 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.857296
Show Author Affiliations
S. A. Cornelissen, Boston Micromachines Corp. (United States)
A. L. Hartzell, Boston Micromachines Corp. (United States)
J. B. Stewart, Boston Micromachines Corp. (United States)
T. G. Bifano, Boston Micromachines Corp. (United States)
Boston Univ. (United States)
P. A. Bierden, Boston Micromachines Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7736:
Adaptive Optics Systems II
Brent L. Ellerbroek; Michael Hart; Norbert Hubin; Peter L. Wizinowich, Editor(s)

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