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Proceedings Paper

Current status of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope wide-field upgrade
Author(s): Richard Savage; John Booth; Mark Cornell; John Good; Gary J. Hill; Hanshin Lee; Phillip MacQueen; Marc Rafal; Brian Vattiat; Karl Gebhardt; Joseph Beno; Joseph Zierer; Dave Perry; Tom Rafferty; Chuck Ramiller; Charles Taylor; Timothy Beets; Richard Hayes; James Heisler; Sarah Hinze; Ian Soukup; John Jackson; Jason Mock; Michael Worthington; Nicholas Mollison; Omar Molina; Brian South; Douglas Wardell; Gregory Wedeking
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Paper Abstract

The Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) is an innovative large telescope of 9.2 meter aperture, located in West Texas at the McDonald Observatory (MDO). The HET operates with a fixed segmented primary and has a tracker which moves the four-mirror corrector and prime focus instrument package to track the sidereal and non-sidereal motions of objects. A major upgrade of the HET is in progress that will increase the pupil size to 10 meters and the field of view to 22' by replacing the corrector, tracker and prime focus instrument package. In addition to supporting the existing suite of instruments, this wide field upgrade will feed a revolutionary new integral field spectrograph called VIRUS, in support of the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). This paper discusses the current status of this upgrade.

Paper Details

Date Published: 7 August 2010
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 7733, Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes III, 773343 (7 August 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.857203
Show Author Affiliations
Richard Savage, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
John Booth, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Mark Cornell, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
John Good, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Gary J. Hill, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Hanshin Lee, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Phillip MacQueen, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Marc Rafal, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Brian Vattiat, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Karl Gebhardt, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Joseph Beno, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Joseph Zierer, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Dave Perry, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Tom Rafferty, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Chuck Ramiller, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Charles Taylor, McDonald Observatory, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Timothy Beets, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Richard Hayes, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
James Heisler, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Sarah Hinze, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Ian Soukup, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
John Jackson, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Jason Mock, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Michael Worthington, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Nicholas Mollison, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Omar Molina, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Brian South, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Douglas Wardell, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Gregory Wedeking, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7733:
Ground-based and Airborne Telescopes III
Larry M. Stepp; Roberto Gilmozzi; Helen J. Hall, Editor(s)

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