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Proceedings Paper

An update on the role of systems modeling in the design and verification of the James Webb Space Telescope
Author(s): Danniella M. Muheim; Michael T. Menzel; Gary Mosier; Joseph M. Howard; Sandra Irish; Peiman Maghami; Kimberly I. Mehalick; Keith A. Parrish; Joseph T. Pitman; Shaun R. Thomson; Charity Asuquo; Carl A. Blaurock; Cherie Congedo; Kong Q. Ha; Norman C. Holmes; Frank X. Liu; Mark A. McGinnis; Stephen Mariconti; Christopher P. May; Blair Russell; James A. Sanders; Shahram Shiri; Jeffrey S. Smith; Dennis L. Skelton
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Paper Abstract

The James Web Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope scheduled for launch in 2014. The imaging performance of the telescope will be diffraction limited at 2μm, defined as having a Strehl ratio >0.8. System-level verification of critical performance requirements will rely on integrated observatory models that predict the wavefront error accurately enough to verify that allocated top-level wavefront error of 150 nm root-mean-squared (rms) through to the wave-front sensor focal plane is met. Furthermore, responses in several key disciplines are strongly crosscoupled. The size of the lightweight observatory structure, coupled with the need to test at cryogenic temperatures, effectively precludes validation of the models and verification of optical performance with a single test in 1-g. Rather, a complex series of incremental tests and measurements are used to anchor components of the end-to-end models at various levels of subassembly, with the ultimate verification of optical performance is by analysis using the assembled models. The assembled models themselves are complex and require the insight of technical experts to assess their ability to meet their objectives. This paper describes the modeling approach used on the JWST through the detailed design phase.

Paper Details

Date Published: 5 August 2010
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 7738, Modeling, Systems Engineering, and Project Management for Astronomy IV, 773814 (5 August 2010); doi: 10.1117/12.856897
Show Author Affiliations
Danniella M. Muheim, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Michael T. Menzel, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Gary Mosier, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Joseph M. Howard, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Sandra Irish, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Peiman Maghami, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Kimberly I. Mehalick, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Keith A. Parrish, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Joseph T. Pitman, Exploration Sciences (United States)
Shaun R. Thomson, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Charity Asuquo, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc. (United States)
Carl A. Blaurock, Nightsky Systems, Inc. (United States)
Cherie Congedo, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc. (United States)
Kong Q. Ha, KDA Engineering (United States)
Norman C. Holmes, Vantage Systems, Inc. (United States)
Frank X. Liu, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc. (United States)
Mark A. McGinnis, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc. (United States)
Stephen Mariconti, Vantage Systems, Inc. (United States)
Christopher P. May, Maze Engineering Solutions (United States)
Blair Russell, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc. (United States)
James A. Sanders, Vantage Systems, Inc. (United States)
Shahram Shiri, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Jeffrey S. Smith, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Dennis L. Skelton, Sigma Space Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 7738:
Modeling, Systems Engineering, and Project Management for Astronomy IV
George Z. Angeli; Philippe Dierickx, Editor(s)

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